EXCEPTIONAL ACADEMIC RESEARCH

Led by:

A MULTI-DISCIPLINARY TEAM TO DRIVE INNOVATION

A unique opportunity to work with leading academics to turn your flood-resilience idea into a reality.

At the Flood Innovation Centre, we have a dedicated researcher with a broad academic background to help support projects and conduct impactful flood-resilience research.

Dr. Kate Smith has been specially selected to ensure businesses have access to ground-breaking research, should they need it. She is also responsible for maximising the Flood Innovation Centre’s impact on the local economy and community and producing leading research in her field.

The core team are supported by an extended cohort of world-leading scientists. Under the leadership of Professor Dan Parsons, the Energy and Environment Institute brings together researchers from a wide range of disciplines to conduct insightful investigations on the global challenges presented by environmental change, underpinning innovations and progression in flood research.

MEET DR. KATE SMITH

DEVELOPING TOOLS TO IMPROVE FLOOD RESILIENCE

Hi, I’m Dr. Kate Smith, a post-doctoral researcher with interests in the cultural anthropology of water, landscapes and flooding. I’m currently developing novel participatory tools to improve flood-resilience communication, and working with the Environment Agency and DEFRA on the implementation of world-leading mobile technology messaging for flood warnings and other emergency messages.

I’m also involved in several community engagement projects alongside colleagues from the Energy and Environment Institute and I’ve recently worked with members of the National Youth Theatre on the development of their latest environment-themed production, MELT.

My specialisms include:

  • Cultural variations of water, landscapes and flooding
  • Development of flood-resilience communications
  • Emergency mobile technology messaging

INFORMING FUTURE FLOOD RISK AND RESILLIENCE ​

Creating crucial simulations together with Wageningen University, researchers at the Environment and Energy Institute have contributed to the prevention of future flooding by growing cress forests and planting matchstick log jams to test natural flood-prevention methods.

As part of the multimillion-pound Hydralab+ research grant, the project addresses the urgent need to understand the consequences of climate change on rivers, estuaries and coasts, helping to determine how they will evolve into the future.

The simulator allows scientists to carry out accurate research around natural flood management, enabling them to control the magnitude and intensity of rainfall whilst representing a range of climate-change scenarios.

HELPING CHILDREN RECOVER FROM DISASTER

Research carried out at the University of Hull has established sound advice and support on how to help children recover from the trauma of floods and other natural disasters.

The project, conducted by PhD researcher Florence Halstead, ascertained the perceptions and experiences of children who were exposed to flooding in the UK and Vietnam.

By involving children in the research process a better understanding of their views, feelings and experiences was garnered. The findings have been collated into a list of five useful tips that can be used by parents and to inform future policy and decision-making.

SHAPING THE FUTURE OF FLOOD INNOVATION

The work carried out by the Flood Innovation Centre has been featured on the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) Pathfinder website.

Defra has funded a number of Community Resilience Pathfinder projects which will enable and stimulate communities at significant or greater risk of flooding to work with key partners, including local authorities, to develop innovative local solutions that enhance flood-risk management and preparedness and improve the community’s financial resilience in relation to flooding.

With the imminent rising flood waters, the Flood Innovation Centre presents itself as an exemplar in flood research, expanding the search for solutions that will allow us to live with the water that is coming and minimize the impact that it has on our lives and property.